Infla-Regulaor

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RELEVANT RESEARCH STUDIES AND ARTICLES

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  1. Rani MP, Padmakumari KP, Sankarikutty B, Cherian OL, Nisha VM, Raghu KG. Inhibitory potential of ginger extracts against enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, inflammation and induced oxidative stress. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2001 Mar; 62(2): 106-110

*Quick Summary of Study: Ginger extracts were shown to inhibit key enzymes within the inflammatory cascade.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20874376

Abstract

Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Gingerols, the major pungent components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes, including the effect of enhancement against insulin sensitivity. In the current study, ginger sequentially extracted with different solvents-namely, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, 70% methanol-water and water-were screened to determine the variations in phenolic-linked active constituents. The potential of these extracts to inhibit key enzymes relevant to type 2 diabetes and inflammation was studied. Phenolic compounds-namely, gingerols and shoagols-were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl acetate extract showed higher activity compared with other extracts. These studies indicate that ginger has very good potential for α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibition relevant for type 2 diabetes management and cyclooxygenase inhibition for inflammation.

2.Lampe J. Spicing up a vegetarian diet: chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003 Sept; 78(3): 5795-5835.

http://www.ajcn.org/content/78/3/579S.full?sid=c228e88a-5e38-45b4-bbf4-517ddf15213a

*Quick Summary of Study: This article explores the beneficial effects of phytochemicals form herbs and other common spices on human health.

Abstract

Thousands of chemical structures have been identified in plant foods. Many are found in spices. Typically, spices are the dried aromatic parts of plants—generally the seeds, berries, roots, pods, and sometimes leaves—that mainly, but not invariably, grow in hot countries. Given the wide range of botanical species and plant parts from which spices are derived, they can contribute significant variety and complexity to the human diet. In the past, the medicinal uses of spices and herbs were often indistinguishable from their culinary uses, and for good reason: people have recognized for centuries both the inherent value, as well as the potential toxicity, of phytochemicals in relation to human health. Plants have the capacity to synthesize a diverse array of chemicals, and understanding how phytochemicals function in plants may further our understanding of the mechanisms by which they benefit humans. In plants, these compounds function to attract beneficial and repel harmful organisms, serve as photoprotectants, and respond to environmental changes. In humans, they can have complementary and overlapping actions, including antioxidant effects, modulation of detoxification enzymes, stimulation of the immune system, reduction of inflammation, modulation of steroid metabolism, and antibacterial and antiviral effects. Embracing a cuisine rich in spice, as well as in fruit and vegetables, may further enhance the chemopreventive capacity of one’s diet.

3.Gagnier JJ, van Tulder MW, Berman B, Bombardier C. Herbal medicine for low back pain: a Cochrane review. Spine. 2007 Jan 1; 78(3): 82-92.

*Quick Summary of Study: This article explains the role that phytochemicals can have on the immune system, digestion and the inflammatory response

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202897

Abstract

Thousands of chemical structures have been identified in plant foods. Many are found in spices. Typically, spices are the dried aromatic parts of plants—generally the seeds, berries, roots, pods, and sometimes leaves—that mainly, but not invariably, grow in hot countries. Given the wide range of botanical species and plant parts from which spices are derived, they can contribute significant variety and complexity to the human diet. In the past, the medicinal uses of spices and herbs were often indistinguishable from their culinary uses, and for good reason: people have recognized for centuries both the inherent value, as well as the potential toxicity, of phytochemicals in relation to human health. Plants have the capacity to synthesize a diverse array of chemicals, and understanding how phytochemicals function in plants may further our understanding of the mechanisms by which they benefit humans. In plants, these compounds function to attract beneficial and repel harmful organisms, serve as photoprotectants, and respond to environmental changes. In humans, they can have complementary and overlapping actions, including antioxidant effects, modulation of detoxification enzymes, stimulation of the immune system, reduction of inflammation, modulation of steroid metabolism, and antibacterial and antiviral effects. Embracing a cuisine rich in spice, as well as in fruit and vegetables, may further enhance the chemopreventive capacity of one’s diet.

4.Meng CQ. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder after all. Curr Top Med Chem. 2006; 6(2): 93-102.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16454761

*Quick Summary of Study: This report explores the role that inflammation has on major diseases such as atherosclerosis.

Abstract

Inflammation has been increasingly recognized as an important player in the pathophysiology of numerous human disorders. Accumulating evidence has led to the conclusion that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, although it was believed to be a disorder of high cholesterol levels in the bloodstream for over a century. Cholesterol does contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but through inflammatory mechanisms. Statins lower cholesterol levels and hence reduce inflammation in the vasculature and prevent heart disease. Statins may also exert anti-inflammatory effects through mechanisms independent of cholesterol lowering. Adhesion molecules, cytokines, oxidative stress, etc. appear to contribute to the inflammatory state of atherosclerosis and therapeutic approaches directed toward these markers or targets have the potential to be effective in reducing inflammation and treating atherosclerosis.

5. Charo IF, Taub R. Anti-inflammatory therapeutics for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2011 May; 10(5):365-376.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21532566

*Quick Summary of Study: This article explains how inflammation is the underlining cause in the pathogenesis of  Atherosclerosis and how therapies should target reducing inflammation as a viable means of treatment.

Abstract

Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke and is thus the underlying pathology of the leading causes of death in the western world. Although risk can be reduced by lowering lipid levels, the equally important contribution of inflammation to the development of cardiovascular disease is not adequately addressed by existing therapies. Here, we summarize the evidence supporting a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, discuss agents that are currently in the clinic and provide a perspective on the challenges faced in the development of drugs that target vascular inflammation.

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